Police Station Representation and Advice

"The lawyers on the crime team are relentlessly good at what they do. They have a collaborative approach and are incredibly thorough and detailed in their work."

Chambers UK 2021

Our criminal law team includes specialist police station advisers.  Our reputation is based on over 80 years of providing quality assistance to our clients, protecting their rights and interests, holding the police to account, and striving for the best result.

We are top ranked in the legal directories and were Firm of the Year: Crime, Fraud and Licensing 2021.  Our experience in guiding clients through the options before them is second to none.

We are proactive in achieving the best results for our clients.  Contacting us as soon as you become aware of a police investigation increases the opportunity to resolve the matter quickly and discreetly.   

An interview at a police station is a stressful and worrying experience and it is essential that you are aware of your rights. We seek to avoid an arrest, thereby protecting you from the potentially onerous consequences that flow from it, such as retention of your biometric data on the Police National Computer, oppressive bail conditions and restrictions on your travel.

There is a myth that those who attend the police station with a lawyer only do so because they are guilty.  In fact, those who have the benefit of legal advice are more able to make the right decision about whether and how to answer questions.  Those that have a lawyer are much less likely to be taken advantage of.  What happens at the police station can dictate how well you are able to defend the case later if it develops.  It also means you have a better chance of bringing the investigation to a conclusion sooner rather than later. 

Many people, when faced with police questioning, attend on their own, believing they can talk their way out of the situation and leave as quickly as possible.  This is rarely the best long term strategy.  Our aim is to help you to stop, think and give the best account of yourself.

Sometimes the best advice is to decline to answer questions, at least until further information is provided as to the case against you; or alternatively sometimes it may be better to produce a written statement setting out your case in a clear and structured way.  Even if you decide to answer questions, you will want to think carefully in advance about the issues with which you will have to deal.  Our lawyers are adept at getting to the crux of the matter and advising you about what evidence you will need to defeat the allegations.

Further information

If you have any questions  or require police station representation or advice, please contact a member of our criminal litigation team.

Our experienced defence lawyers are available 24 hours a day.  We are able to attend the police station when you need us.  Our presence at the police station throughout the period of your detention ensures that the police deal with your case expeditiously and in accordance with the law.

We are ranked in Band 1 for General Crime by both Chambers  and Partners and Legal 500.

The ‘first-rate’ team at Kingsley Napley LLP is ‘efficient, strategic, committed and able to handle the most complex of criminal cases as well as more general crime cases’. It advises corporations and individuals on sexual offences, violent crimes, drug offences, firearms offences, extradition and high-profile matters with an international element."

Legal 500 UK 2019 

They very much embrace the need to look at the whole situation; they look at the media exposure - for people in the public eye and for a particular type of high net worth individual, that's very important and I've seen them handle that side of things very well. They're one of those few firms that would give clients a genuine round-the-clock service, seven days a week"

Chambers High Net Worth Guide 2018

WHAT CLIENTS AND DIRECTORIES HAVE SAID

Kingsley Napley has real strength and expertise at all levels of the crime group. The team is hard-working, focused on getting results and yet maintains the human touch."

Legal 500 UK 2020

They are able to draw on expertise across the firm to provide a seamless service - if you are facing criminal allegations they can also handle the media, as well as any employment issues or regulatory proceedings that may arise."

Chambers UK 2020

The ‘first-rate’ team at Kingsley Napley LLP is ‘efficient, strategic, committed and able to handle the most complex of criminal cases as well as more general crime cases’. It advises corporations and individuals on sexual offences, violent crimes, drug offences, firearms offences, extradition and high-profile matters with an international element."

Legal 500 UK 2019

Leading criminal team that demonstrates impressive strength in depth across a broad range of cases. Regularly acts on high-profile cases involving well-known public figures. Highly recommended for its handling of complex murder charges and historic sexual abuse investigations."

Chambers UK 2019, A Client's Guide to the UK Legal Profession

They stand out because of their ability to stop a case before it gets started. Their commitment, preparation and tenacity set them apart. They are a strong firm."

Chambers UK 2018, A Client's Guide to the UK Legal Profession

They pick up some fantastic work, they have some fantastic clients and they have a skill of trying to get rid of matters before they go too far."

Chambers High Net Worth Guide 2018

Their reputation as being the pre-eminent solicitors in this market is deserved. They are justifiably instructions in infamous, heavyweight cases and I can't imagine that anyone is ever dissatisfied with the service they receive."

Chambers UK 2017

The crime team is first rate. They are dedicated, hard working and tireless in their preparation of cases."

Chambers UK 2017

"It is an excellent firm - the level of preparation for cases is just fantastic."                           

Chambers UK, A Client's Guide to the UK Legal Profession

''...Kingsley Napley LLP’s ‘high-end practice’ is part of the firm’s criminal law team, and able to draw on this expertise to handle enforcement actions for its individual and growing corporate client base...''

Legal 500 UK

"Kingsley Napley is pre-eminent at what it does: high-end, complex criminal work for high-profile individuals."

Chambers UK, A Clients Guide to the UK Legal Profession

"One of the most highly regarded criminal defence firms, noted for its high-profile mandates from media organisations and sports professionals."

Chambers UK, A Clients Guide to the UK Legal Profession

First class in terms of client care, as well as its thorough and meticulous approach to case preparation, both at pre-charge and at trial."

Legal 500 UK, 2017

 

They are determined to do the best for their clients at all times and leave absolutely no stone unturned. It is a brilliant defence firm."

Chambers UK 2016, A Client's Guide to the UK Legal Profession

 

The KN team are one of the best known, oldest and highly regarded teams in this area of work. They get first rate work and deliver excellent results."

Legal 500 UK 2021

In dealing with the firm, every aspect was outstanding and of the highest quality."

Chambers UK 2021

Highly collaborative and team based in everything they do. Friendly and down to earth while also being world class. Uniquely able to bring together the brightest and the best but without being pompous or superior in their attitude. Great listeners, hard workers and tactically the best in the business."

Legal 500 UK 2021

A dynamic team that shows good attention to detail."

Chambers UK 2021

KN are exceptional in almost all categories! They are streaks ahead of everyone else and provide a very high level of service. If I were in trouble that’s where I would go.  I like the fact they are genuinely committed to providing excellence even on less lucrative cases or on cases of less seriousness. They completely get how serious every case is for a client . They unfailing do the very best for their clients."

Legal 500 UK 2021

Latest blogs & news

Being accused of sexual misconduct when you are a child

As a criminal defence solicitor specialising in defending allegations of sexual misconduct and representing children, the perfect storm that has erupted since the launch of Everyone’s Invited has made me privy to some of the saddest and most distraught children I have ever advised.

Regressive approaches to sentencing will not help children or society

The head of the Youth Justice Board has rightly criticised the Government’s plans to raise child custodial sentences. At a time when England and Wales falls behind most European countries in protecting children with the lowest age of criminal responsibility (10), it is inexplicable that the Government is taking a further regressive step by seeking to increase the length of time that children must spend in prison.

Youth Justice: Is reform on the way for young people who turn 18 while in the criminal justice system?

Children under 18 years old are afforded a number of special protections by virtue of the fact that they are children in the eyes of the law. These protections fall away when an individual turns 18 and they are legally considered an ‘adult’.  For defendants who cross the threshold into adulthood during the criminal process, the impact of reaching this milestone can be profound.

Tackling Racial Injustice: Children and the Youth Justice System

Today JUSTICE has published the latest working party report ‘Tackling Racial Injustice: Children and the Youth Justice System’. I am delighted to have had the opportunity to chair the working party that produced this report. The report makes practical recommendations to reduce BAME disproportionality in the Youth Justice System (YJS) of England and Wales.

Outcome 22: are the police utilising this important diversionary tool or leaving it on the shelf?

David Lammy’s landmark review of racial bias in the Criminal Justice System (‘CJS’), made many key recommendations to help improve trust and fairness in the CJS when it was published in 2017. One of which was to expand the use of the deferred prosecution for adults and young offenders.

GOWISELY: Time to stop and think about stop and search

The aftermath of the death of George Floyd and the strength of feeling surrounding the Black Lives Matter movement should provide Police forces in the UK with a reason to re-assess their relationships with the communities that they serve.

Student misconduct allegations and the right to a fair hearing

The temptation to approach the adjudication of a student complaint as merely an ‘internal process’, is one of the most common errors made by some higher education institutions. The process adopted must be capable of examination by an independent and external eye to ensure that at each stage of the process, the rights of all individuals involved are protected.

How Universities should investigate a complaint under the disciplinary procedure

Once an allegation is made against a student (or member of academic staff), either by another student, a member of staff or someone outside the university, it is important that that the University takes stock of the issue and acts carefully to ensure fairness to all parties. 

The first crucial steps: how Universities should respond to allegations of misconduct

University providers owe a duty of care towards staff members and students; this duty takes on particular significance during a disciplinary process and it is essential that Universities provide appropriate and relevant information and support to all parties involved in allegations of misconduct.

Getting it right from the start: University policies for dealing with non-academic misconduct complaints

What happens when a complaint is made to a University about the conduct of a student or a member of academic staff?  What should the procedures for the resolution of these complaints look like and how can all parties be reassured that such allegations will be resolved fairly? 

I May Destroy You, Part 3: A study of sexual assault - Voyeurism, Revenge Porn, Youth Justice and False Allegations

This blog series examines some of the sexual offences encountered by the main characters in the explosive 12-part BBC series, ‘I May Destroy You’. This final instalment focuses on a character called Theo and the events that occurred when she was a youth, during her high school years.

Legal limbo for children: The risks of turning 18

The impact of Coronavirus is significant and far-reaching for all children and young adults. For a youth justice system creaking under strain with serious delays, the lockdown has only compounded the problems and brings a raft of serious consequences. Timely justice is ever more important.

Appealing and challenging university disciplinary decisions: what students need to know

Where a student has had an unfavourable outcome from a university disciplinary process, that need not be the end of the road. It may still be possible for them to appeal or otherwise challenge the higher education provider’s decision.

Reflections on Westminster Higher Education Conference, Priorities for tackling sexual violence and harassment in higher education

At last week’s Westminster Higher Education (HE) Conference, speakers from Student Unions, Universities, to regulators and law firms discussed how best to tackle sexual violence and harassment in high education, including how to change campus culture and improve complaints and disciplinary processes. This blog summarises those discussions and reflects on where the sector’s key focus areas should be now. 

Joe Marler and the case of the arched eyebrow

Props are well known for their fondness of the ‘dark arts’ of Rugby, but over the weekend (7 March 2020) the England prop Joe Marler went a step further. In this blog, Matthew Hardcastle looks at the situation and explains whether it should be considered sexual assault or not.

Cross-border criminal justice post-Brexit – Operation Yellowhammer

Tucked in between the “reasonable worst-case” scenarios for food, trade and fuel is a stark one liner: “Law enforcement and information sharing between U.K. and EU will be disrupted”. The reduction in capability of law enforcement agencies that will come from a no deal will, according to government documents, be accompanied by an increase in cross-border crime.

Challenging the prosecution of weak cases and the lack of anonymity for those accused of sexual offences

The recent acquittal of our client, Oritsé Williams, once again puts a spotlight on the prosecution of rape and serious sexual offences, and the particular complexities faced by high profile individuals defending allegations of this nature.

SFO guidance on co-operation: more carrot than stick?

The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) was established to investigate and prosecute cases involving serious or complex fraud, a mission that inevitably leads it to the corporate sector. In 2010, it was given two significant tools in dealing with companies: a simple route to corporate criminal liability for bribery cases in the Bribery Act 2010 (the stick); and a means of incentivising a company fixed with corporate criminal liability to co-operate with the SFO by entering into a deferred prosecution agreement (DPA) and so avoiding a conviction (the carrot).

Criminalising children – at what age and what cost?

As the Scottish Parliament raises the age of criminal responsibility to 12, the law in England & Wales becomes even more isolated from the rest of the Western World. The Equality and Human Rights Commission, in relying on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), a convention to which the UK is a signatory, continues to criticise the UK in no uncertain terms regarding our failure to raise the age from 10 (the lowest in the region) to 14.

Sentences for young people should take account of their maturity

Ministry of Justice figures show that 18 to 25-year-olds account for a third of the total social and economic costs of crime as victims or offenders, despite making up only 10 per cent of the population.

Police Station Representation and Advice Insights

View all

News

The perils of historic sexual abuse allegations - Sandra Paul interviewed on BBC Radio 4 Women's Hour

Jill Lorimer quoted in various sources following FCA decision to ban three financial professionals for non-financial misconduct

Clothing fibres can transfer without contact, study finds, posing issues for future criminal investigations - Nicola Finnerty quoted in The Telegraph

Pace Odyssey - Matthew Hardcastle quoted in The Law Society Gazette

Sex, lies and legal consent: Can deceit turn sex into rape? - Sandra Paul comments in BBC News

View all

Blogs

Outcome 22: are the police utilising this important diversionary tool or leaving it on the shelf?

Justice delayed is justice denied for clients in lockdown limbo

GOWISELY: Time to stop and think about stop and search

Law regarding consent is not confused, wrong or unfair - Sandra Paul writes for The Law Society Gazette

COVID-19: Distinguishing crime

COVID-19 - Criminal justice at the coalface

COVID-19: Managing health and risk whilst in police custody - an update

COVID-19 - Managing health and risk whilst in police custody

Review of the reforms to pre-charge bail – is the law the problem?

Challenging the prosecution of weak cases and the lack of anonymity for those accused of sexual offences

Criminalising children – at what age and what cost?

Sentences for young people should take account of their maturity

Coming soon: the Domestic Abuse Bill

“Stealthing” conviction brings conditional consent out in the open

On the cliff edge: Do we need formal sentencing guidelines for ‘young adults’?

Eastenders explores rape: Part 5 - what happens when a complainant wants to "drop the case"?

“GPS tagging”: real time monitoring of individuals

Lie detection tests for convicted domestic abuse offenders is a costly distraction

Sex for rent / rent for sex - revised CPS guidance

Eastenders explores rape: Part 4 – what happens when someone is accused of rape?

Socially engineered juries....what next?

Indecent images – are the police about to embark upon a new approach?

EastEnders explores rape: Part 3 – witness interviews

EastEnders explores rape: Part 2 – reporting a rape

New guidance for prosecutors will make the slow grind of our legal system worse

C5 notices – extrajudicial punishment or innovative policing?

EastEnders explores rape: Part 1 - consent is more complicated than ‘yes’ or ‘no’

The risk of Salmond’s aggressive approach to allegations

The criminal offence of controlling and coercive behaviour: avoiding the potential pitfalls in family proceedings

PACE under review: no excuse for failing to maintain the dignity of those held in custody

Disclosure of Evidence in Criminal Cases – time to restore fairness in the criminal justice system

Revised PACE Codes of Practice coming into force

What is “sextortion” and what can you do about it?

Russia 2018: the ugly face of the beautiful game

Sexting: “Outcome 21” - a solution or part of the problem?

Youth Justice Part Two: Mini sex offenders or just kids?

Youth Justice Part One: Criminalising kids - a guide to the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act for young people

Time to apply the brakes: do we need a new offence of dangerous cycling?

Mobile Fingerprinting Raises Privacy Issues

Prison sentence following “victimless prosecution” for controlling and coercive behaviour

Policing the internet – "fake news" and social media offence update

John Worboys – questions raised around life sentences, Parole Board decisions and publicity

Controlling and Coercive Behaviour: Family and Criminal Proceedings update

Divorce and coercive & controlling behaviour - Harassment’s big brother?

Youth Justice: time to change the age of criminal responsibility?

When should the police name a suspect?

Teenagers and the “sexting crisis”: sexting is serious

The Trial: A Murder in the Family – The Verdict

The Trial: A Murder in the Family – The Jury

The Trial: A Murder in the Family – The Evidence

The Trial: A Murder in the Family – Where are the Solicitors?

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