Criminal Law Blog

19 July 2019

Failure to act as a ‘Minister of Justice’ will have costs implications for the private prosecutor

A private prosecutor and the lawyers who act on their behalf must meet the same high standards of conduct expected of a public prosecutor. The High Court has recently handed down judgement in a case where the issue of the objectivity of the private prosecutor was subject to scrutiny.  The case is a salutary reminder to the putative private prosecutor of the benefits of taking independent legal advice on the merits of their case before commencing proceedings.

Shannett Thompson

18 July 2019

Launch of the Code for Private Prosecutors

On 18 July 2019 the Private Prosecutors’ Association (the PPA) the UK’s only association for professionals with expertise in the bringing of private prosecutions, published the first Code for Private Prosecutors (the Code).  

Melinka Berridge

18 July 2019

International Criminal Court at 21: controversy still remains

Yesterday, 17th July, as the anniversary of the adoption of the Rome Statue, is celebrated as International Criminal Justice Day. The Rome Statute led to the formation of the International Criminal Court (ICC), which tries the most serious international crimes of genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and the crime of aggression.

Anna Holmes

3 July 2019

London Climate Action Week: International criminal law and the environment – considering a law of ‘ecocide’

In April 2019, Polly Higgins, a British barrister, passed away after devoting ten years of her life to a campaign for a new law of ‘ecocide’ – a law that would make corporate executives and government ministers criminally liable for the damage they cause to the environment.  In this blog, we consider the current framework for punishing environmental crime at international level, and what the proposed crime of ecocide might look like.

Josephine Burnett

21 June 2019

Criminalising children – at what age and what cost?

As the Scottish Parliament raises the age of criminal responsibility to 12, the law in England & Wales becomes even more isolated from the rest of the Western World. The Equality and Human Rights Commission, in relying on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), a convention to which the UK is a signatory, continues to criticise the UK in no uncertain terms regarding our failure to raise the age from 10 (the lowest in the region) to 14.

Sandra Paul

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