Legal Services Regulation Blog

23 March 2020

Covid 19 - a reminder for solicitors and law firms about their regulatory obligations

Towards the end of last year I commented, as part of our Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) Standards and Regulations (StaRs) blog series, that the introduction of the StaRs on 25 November 2019 was an opportunity to take stock and introduce steps to ensure compliance going forward; it was a time to prioritise, not panic.

Jessica Clay

6 February 2020

Regulators had better get ready for partisan politicisation

With the next Labour leader likely to be a lawyer, it’s inevitable that watchdogs will be co-opted into political struggles.

Iain Miller

12 December 2019

Tis’ the season…to comply with your professional obligations

With Christmas just around the corner, many of us will be inundated with festive events to kick off the season in style. Whilst this is an opportunity to indulge in mince pies, mulled wine and socialise with colleagues, remember that upholding the reputation of your profession remains a permanent state of affairs, and not an obligation which can be ‘relaxed’ simply because it’s Christmas.

Kathryn Sheridan

21 November 2019

StaRs: Time to prioritise, but not to panic

The introduction of the SRA Standards and Regulations (StaRs) on 25 November 2019 brings with it a number of changes to the legal regulatory landscape, as set out by my colleagues in previous blogs in this series. Change is not always something we welcome with open arms, especially when busy workloads leave little time for us to take stock. This, however, is a real opportunity to do just that; review your firm’s current systems, processes and approach to complying with its regulatory obligations, and reflect on your own practice, and improve these for the better.

Charlotte Judd

20 November 2019

StaRs: The new ‘freelance’ solicitor: practical aspects and our predictions

The SRA Standards and Regulations (StaRs) were over four years in the making and whilst many of the changes they introduced are more noticeable in form, rather than in (any new) substance, the same cannot be said for the provisions which widen the legal market by liberalising the ways in which solicitors can practise.  One such notable change is the widening of the scope within which solicitors can practise on their own and the creation of a new type of solicitor: the ‘SRA-regulated independent solicitor’ (or, ‘freelancer’).

Sian Jones

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