Immigration Law Blog

8 November 2017

#Brexit: Latest proposals for EU citizens living in the UK

The British government has published a technical note setting out its proposed administrative procedures for EU citizens living in the UK – and their family members – who want to stay on after Brexit. 

31 October 2017

KN Global immigration update - October 2017

Our October 2017 global immigration update provides details on key changes to immigration rules in global jurisdictions. In this month's issue we include Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, Qatar, Vietnam, Thailand and Canada. Please note that all immigration rules are subject to change and whilst correct at the time of publication, they should not be relied upon as legal advice or a statement of accuracy at a later date.

Benjamin Sookia

12 October 2017

Free movement is our right. Don’t give it up.

More than a year after the EU referendum we’re still hearing the same arguments from both sides. Leavers, including the current government, have interpreted the result as a vote for ending the free movement of EU citizens because of concerns about wages and public services. Remainers focus on staying in the single market and say that free movement is the price we have to pay. 

2 October 2017

Banks required to carry out 70 million immigration checks every quarter

From 1 January 2018, banks and building societies will be required to carry out a further 70 million immigration status checks every quarter. The Immigration Act 2014 requires banks and building societies, including banks that are UK branches of EEA banks and non-EEA banks, to carry out checks when opening current accounts for the purposes of identifying ‘disqualified persons’. 

Luke Gregory

11 September 2017

KN Global immigration update - September 2017

Our September 2017 global immigration update provides details on key changes to immigration rules in global jurisdictions. In this month's issue we include the EU, Cyprus, Switzerland, Austria, New Zealand, Malaysia, Japan and Singapore. Please note that all immigration rules are subject to change and whilst correct at the time of publication, they should not be relied upon as legal advice or a statement of accuracy at a later date.

Benjamin Sookia

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