Immigration Law Blog

12 March 2019

No-deal Brexit: Should employers sponsor their new EU staff?

The prospect of the UK leaving the EU without a deal has caused a great deal of uncertainty, not least among EU nationals who are considering a future move to the UK for work. How can UK employers provide reassurance to these prospective employees that their status will be secure?

Nicolas Rollason

1 March 2019

Brexit – take back control over your immigration status

As the UK hurtles ever closer to a possible cliff edge and the spectre of ‘no deal’ Brexit looms large in everyone’s minds, it is easy to feel we have no control over the direction we are heading in and the impact that may have on our lives. Those individuals who have obtained the right to live in the UK by virtue of their EU citizenship or their family relationship to an EU citizen can, however, take back control over their immigration status and rest a little easier in the weeks to come about at least one aspect of this quagmire.

Katie Newbury

7 February 2019

Designs for a better future – is immigration the key to preserving the UK’s post-Brexit architecture sector?

The Royal Institute for British Architects (RIBA) have published a recent study outlining that the end of free movement post-Brexit could potentially jeopardise the UK’s £4.8 billion architecture sector as nearly half of EU architects have considered leaving.  However recent changes have been set in motion to help mitigate this by helping to attract new and upcoming talent in the sector.

Royce Clemente

18 January 2019

Shutdowns and Brexit Omnishambles – how fear of immigration has brought us to a standstill

It is January 2019 and I am a dual British-American citizen witnessing the complete paralysis of both of my countries’ governments, one in partial shutdown and the other unable to break the deadlock Brexit has wrought.

Katie Newbury

17 December 2018

Deal or no deal: what Brexit could mean for my German mother

With less than four months to go until the UK leaves the European Union (EU), we still don’t know what deal, if any, the UK will have with the EU. A big part of that deal relates to securing the rights of the more than 3 million EEA citizens living in the UK. While the Government has confirmed their intention to roll out the proposed Settled Status scheme regardless as to whether the withdrawal agreement is approved, those seeking greater certainty about their status and who are eligible, are looking to naturalise as British citizens. For some Europeans, the decision to naturalise is a simple one. For others, it may mean giving up their existing nationality.

Christina Orthodoxou

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