Youth crime and justice

26 June 2020

Legal limbo for children: The risks of turning 18

The impact of Coronavirus is significant and far-reaching for all children and young adults. For a youth justice system creaking under strain with serious delays, the lockdown has only compounded the problems and brings a raft of serious consequences. Timely justice is ever more important.

Áine Kervick

27 April 2020

Appealing and challenging university disciplinary decisions: what students need to know

Where a student has had an unfavourable outcome from a university disciplinary process, that need not be the end of the road. It may still be possible for them to appeal or otherwise challenge the higher education provider’s decision.

Sophie Kemp

9 April 2020

Reflections on Westminster Higher Education Conference, Priorities for tackling sexual violence and harassment in higher education

At last week’s Westminster Higher Education (HE) Conference, speakers from Student Unions, Universities, to regulators and law firms discussed how best to tackle sexual violence and harassment in high education, including how to change campus culture and improve complaints and disciplinary processes. This blog summarises those discussions and reflects on where the sector’s key focus areas should be now. 

Sian Jones

21 June 2019

Criminalising children – at what age and what cost?

As the Scottish Parliament raises the age of criminal responsibility to 12, the law in England & Wales becomes even more isolated from the rest of the Western World. The Equality and Human Rights Commission, in relying on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), a convention to which the UK is a signatory, continues to criticise the UK in no uncertain terms regarding our failure to raise the age from 10 (the lowest in the region) to 14.

Sandra Paul

22 May 2019

Sentences for young people should take account of their maturity

Ministry of Justice figures show that 18 to 25-year-olds account for a third of the total social and economic costs of crime as victims or offenders, despite making up only 10 per cent of the population.

Sandra Paul

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