Corporate and Commercial Law Blog

Insights and legal updates from our specialist corporate lawyers.

1 May 2020

Bounce Back Loan Scheme: Is it a bounce back from CBILS?

This week the government announced a further loan scheme to help small and medium-sized businesses affected by coronavirus. In a reaction to the criticism received for the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (“CBILS”) and its implementation, the Bounce Bank Loan Scheme is promised as a simplified scheme which allows small and medium-sized businesses to borrow up to 25% of their turnover, capped at £50,000.

Emer Hughes

22 April 2020

Has the S.O.S from startups been answered?

Since the start of the coronavirus outbreak, the UK government has launched a number of schemes offering financial support for businesses. This support includes the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, the Small Business Grant Fund, the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (“CBILS”).

Emer Hughes

20 April 2020

The Coronavirus challenge for tech coworking spaces

This blog will explore the difficulties currently facing tech coworking spaces in light of the Covid-19 pandemic, how providers can keep tenants engaged and what the future may hold for these spaces. For an audio introduction to this topic, please listen to episode 7 of our Tech in Two Minutes podcast.

Andrew Solomon

9 April 2020

Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme: A lifeline or distraction?

The grandly titled Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (“CBILS”) was announced by Rishi Sunak as part of his first budget on 11th March.  Sunak, in the position of chancellor for only a matter of days, set out a series of plans which he claimed would represent the biggest fiscal boost to the economy in 30 years, and which were also intended to protect the UK economy from the impact of Covid-19.

James Fulforth

30 March 2020

Lurking in the shadows - When is a "director" a director?

When is a director a director? At first glance this may appear to be a facile question. Why would individuals who only carry the title “director” fall within this group? Surely a director must be someone who has been formally appointed as a director? Well, yes and no. For instance, someone who is involved in the day to day management of a business, but has not been formally appointed as a director or someone who tells the board what to do may also be considered to be a director for the purposes of company law.

Luke Gregory

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