Public Law Blog

Insights and legal updates from our specialist public law solicitors.

29 July 2019

High Court finds Mayor’s Congestion Charge decision did not involve unlawful discrimination

On 24 July 2019, the High Court handed down judgment in R (on the application of Independent Workers Union Of Great Britain and others) v Mayor Of London [2019] EWHC 1997 (Admin). This case related to the decision in December 2018 by the Mayor of London to remove an exemption and require private hire vehicles (“PHV”) to pay the Congestion Charge from 8 April 2019

 

Adam Chapman

23 July 2019

“Volaw Trust” - A strengthening of the privilege against self incrimination from requests for pre-existing documents?

The combined appeals of (1) Volaw Trust and Corporate Services Ltd and others v the Comptroller of Taxes and another and (2) Volaw Trust and Corporate Services Ltd and others v HM Attorney General for Jersey [2019] UKPC 29 provide interesting guidance on the approach to be taken by the courts in examining whether requirements for the production of pre-existing documents may infringe Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights (“Article 6”). Prior to this judgment it had been presumed that legal requirements to produce material existing independently of the will of the accused would not engage Article 6. The Board’s judgment suggests a more nuanced approach is required.  

Adam Chapman

5 July 2019

London Climate Action Week: Cutting through the London smog - the big question still to be answered about the death of Ella-Kissi Debrah

At the end of the inquest in 2014 into the death of Ella Kissi-Debrah, the coroner concluded that this nine year old girl suffered an asthma attack, followed by a seizure, and died after unsuccessful resuscitation. This is one possible answer to the question of how Ella died. However, there is clearly a bigger question which needs to be answered. 

Emily Carter

1 July 2019

London Climate Action Week: Saving Londoners from nitrogen dioxide, one judicial review at a time

According to the most recent data, two million people in London are living with illegal levels of air pollution. Nitrogen dioxide is one of the main pollutants and road transport is estimated to be responsible for 50% of total emissions.

Sarah Burton

30 May 2019

The grey area between Article 2 and ordinary medical negligence? The High Court considers Parkinson and the deaths of vulnerable people in care homes

As we discussed in our recent blog, some inquests will automatically be designated ‘Article 2 inquests’ if the deceased died whilst under the control of the state. Other inquests will only become Article 2 inquests if there is evidence of systemic failures of processes and systems to protect life. Therefore a case of ordinary medical negligence would not trigger Article 2, as confirmed in Parkinson [2018] 4 W.L.R 106.

Sarah Burton

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