Legal Updates

30 May 2019

‘World-leading’ Modern Slavery Act 2015: review confirms more to be done

The Independent Review of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 commenced in July 2018 with a remit to consider specific provisions of the Act: the role of the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner; transparency in supply chains; Independent Child Trafficking Advocates; and the legal application of the act. The final report was published in May 2019.  This follows a series of interim reports on the four themes.

Sophie Kemp

8 May 2019

Coming soon: the Domestic Abuse Bill

On 21 January 2019, the draft Domestic Abuse Bill (“the Bill”) was published by the Government. The stated aim of the Bill is to protect and support victims and their families, pursue and deter offenders and improve the performance of local agencies and services in instances of domestic abuse.  It is of relevance to both criminal and family law practitioners.

David Sleight

25 April 2019

On the cliff edge: Do we need formal sentencing guidelines for ‘young adults’?

Most of us remember our 18th birthday.  Finally you are old enough to do a whole list of activities which were previously prohibited – you can vote, buy alcohol, open your own bank account, gamble or even get that tattoo you always wanted. On top of this, you are now deemed an ‘adult’ in the eyes of the law.

Maeve Keenan

12 March 2019

Estate agents come under the HMRC spotlight

On 4 March, Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (“HMRC”) announced that they had imposed a £215,000 fine on Countrywide estate agents for failing to register the company as required under the Money Laundering Regulations 2017. This announcement was swiftly followed by the publication of the Treasury Committee report on economic crime on 8 March, where estate agents came in for stinging criticism for failing to have proper regard to money laundering compliance and risk assessment in their dealings. 

Alun Milford

28 February 2019

New powers to gather electronic evidence from overseas agreed

The Crime (Overseas Production Orders) Act 2019 marks a major departure in the current mutual legal assistance regime in relation to gathering electronic evidence from overseas. Receiving Royal Assent on the 12 February 2019, the act gives powers to law enforcement to apply for an Overseas Production Order (OPO) to obtain electronic data directly from service providers based outside the UK for the purposes of criminal investigations and prosecutions for serious crime. 

Rebecca Niblock

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