Brexit: Immigration

22 January 2021

The EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement – does it make any difference to UK and EU immigration?

Citizens’ Rights were one of the first and most important components to be negotiated and protected in the November 2019 Withdrawal Agreement.  However, whilst the rights of British citizens resident in the EU and EU citizens resident in the UK before 11pm on 31 December 2020 are protected, free movement of people ended on that date.

Ilda de Sousa

30 August 2019

Handle with care: why it’s time to treat EU nationals responsibly

Katie Newbury discusses the implications of a no-deal Brexit on free movement and the impact on Europeans living in the UK.

Katie Newbury

5 August 2019

Glitches in the EU Settlement Scheme

The full launch of the EU Settlement Scheme on 30 March 2019 was a welcome development for many EEA nationals. However, whilst the EU Settlement Scheme has been generally well-received, glitches in the system are materialising. 

Ilda de Sousa

7 February 2019

Designs for a better future – is immigration the key to preserving the UK’s post-Brexit architecture sector?

The Royal Institute for British Architects (RIBA) have published a recent study outlining that the end of free movement post-Brexit could potentially jeopardise the UK’s £4.8 billion architecture sector as nearly half of EU architects have considered leaving.  However recent changes have been set in motion to help mitigate this by helping to attract new and upcoming talent in the sector.

17 December 2018

Deal or no deal: what Brexit could mean for my German mother

With less than four months to go until the UK leaves the European Union (EU), we still don’t know what deal, if any, the UK will have with the EU. A big part of that deal relates to securing the rights of the more than 3 million EEA citizens living in the UK. While the Government has confirmed their intention to roll out the proposed Settled Status scheme regardless as to whether the withdrawal agreement is approved, those seeking greater certainty about their status and who are eligible, are looking to naturalise as British citizens. For some Europeans, the decision to naturalise is a simple one. For others, it may mean giving up their existing nationality.

Christina Orthodoxou

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