Brexit Blog

For regular updates on Brexit and how it may affect you, your family and/or business, please read our Brexit blog and Twitter feed @KNBrexitLegal

12 November 2018

Global Britain: The Future of UK Sanctions Policy

Sanctions under scrutiny
The House of Commons Foreign Affairs committee has launched an inquiry into the future of UK sanctions policy to “explore and evaluate” different options for the UK’s approach to sanctions policy after leaving the EU.

In launching the inquiry the committee underlines that “Sanctions are an essential instrument of foreign policy, enabling the Government to penalise rogue regimes and human rights abusers around the world, and to combat the influence of so-called dirty money here in the UK.”

Ed Smyth

24 October 2018

How does secondary legislation come into force? The enactment of secondary legislation and the impact on subsequent litigation

Many who voted for Brexit did so to ‘Take Back Control’ from the EU, but who will legislative control pass to after Exit Day and what are the possible consequences for our constitution and for all of us? In the third post in our Public Law team’s blog series Fred Allen outlines the processes by which secondary legislation is enacted and examines how these might affect judicial scrutiny. Follow our Public Law blog for more.

Fred Allen

20 September 2018

No-deal Brexit and the impact on patient safety

On 23 August 2018 the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Matt Hancock sent a letter to all NHS organisations, GPs, community pharmacies and other service providers as an update on the governments on-going preparations for a  no-deal Brexit scenario and what the health and care system need to consider in the lead up to March 2019.

Sevim Ahmet

19 September 2018

Mutual trust remains until we leave: notification of intention to leave the EU not an exceptional circumstance

This blog reviews Case C-327/18 PPU Judgment of the Court (First Chamber) 19 September 2018. In short: “Mere notification” is not an exceptional circumstance within the meaning of the case law which is capable of justifying a refusal to execute an EAW. Substantial grounds to believe that the requested person is at risk of being deprived of rights recognised by the Charter and the Framework Decision, following the withdrawal from the EU of the issuing MS, are required for the MS to refuse to execute the EAW while the issuing MS remains a member of the EU.

Áine Kervick

19 September 2018

What is secondary legislation and why do we have it?

Many who voted for Brexit did so to ‘Take Back Control’ from the EU, but who will legislative control pass to after Exit Day and what are the possible consequences for our constitution and for all of us? In the second post in our Public Law team’s series Nick Wrightson outlines why secondary legislation is necessary in modern Britain. See our Public Law Blog for more.

Nick Wrightson

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