Birth

30 November 2015

The ‘Weekend Effect’ – Babies born at weekend more likely to die

Babies born at the weekend are more likely to die within seven days than those born on weekdays, according to a study published last week in the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

This research adds further fuel to the continuing row over the alleged “weekend effect” (see our previous blog, "The ‘Weekend Effect’ – How to avoid dying in hospital"), which ignited following the publication of a study in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine suggesting that an extra 11,000 people died each year following admission to hospital on a weekend as opposed to a weekday.

Katie Allard

23 October 2015

Cerebral Palsy - what are the triggers for investigating a clinical negligence claim?

For many children and adults there is no connection between their cerebral palsy and the circumstances of their birth. For others there is a direct causal link, and for them, their injury may have been avoidable.  

Bridget Hughes

17 July 2015

Birth injury series - caesarean section

Families affected by a birth injury are often reluctant to pursue a claim against the NHS or private hospital involved with their child’s birth.  They may be distraught and finding it difficult to come to terms with the devastating news that their child has a catastrophic brain injury.

The focus of this blog is caesaren section and is the sixth and final blog in our birth injury series.

This blog first appeared in At Home Magazine.

10 July 2015

Birth injury series - Cerebral palsy and brain damage

Families affected by a birth injury are often reluctant to pursue a claim against the NHS or private hospital involved with their child’s birth.  They may be distraught and finding it difficult to come to terms with the devastating news that their child has a catastrophic brain injury.

The focus of this blog is cerebral palsy and brain damage and is the fifth in our series of six birth injury blogs.

This blog first appeared in At Home Magazine.

24 June 2015

Birth injury series - jaundice and kernicterus

Some birth injuries can be anticipated and with prompt and appropriate action serious injuries can sometimes be avoided. If a birth injury is sustained through lack of appropriate care it may be possible to make a clinical negligence claim for compensation.

The focus of this blog is Jaundice and Kernicterus and it is the third in our series of six birth injury blogs. 

This article first appeared in At Home Magazine. 

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